scienceisbeauty
scienceisbeauty:

3D rendering of graphene hole. TEAM 0.5 image made with WSxM.
Source: Watching Atoms Move at the Edge of a 2D Crystal, Zettl Research Group, Department of Physics at U.C. Berkeley
About the TEAM Project:

In December 1959, physicist Richard Feynman presented his famous lecture “There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom”, now seen by many as the founding vision for nanoscience.
When he spoke about electron microscopy, Feynman posed this challenge: “The electron microscope is not quite good enough, with the greatest care and effort, it can only resolve about 10 angstroms … Is there no way to make the electron microscope more powerful?”
In 2009, exactly 50 years later, a group of scientists will meet the Feynman challenge with delivery of the TEAM microscope, an instrument to provide unprecedented opportunities to observe atomic scale order, electronic structure and dynamics of individual nanostructures.


Very pretty.  Carbon makes for neat pictures.

scienceisbeauty:

3D rendering of graphene hole. TEAM 0.5 image made with WSxM.

Source: Watching Atoms Move at the Edge of a 2D CrystalZettl Research GroupDepartment of Physics at U.C. Berkeley

About the TEAM Project:

In December 1959, physicist Richard Feynman presented his famous lecture “There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom”, now seen by many as the founding vision for nanoscience.

When he spoke about electron microscopy, Feynman posed this challenge: “The electron microscope is not quite good enough, with the greatest care and effort, it can only resolve about 10 angstroms … Is there no way to make the electron microscope more powerful?”

In 2009, exactly 50 years later, a group of scientists will meet the Feynman challenge with delivery of the TEAM microscope, an instrument to provide unprecedented opportunities to observe atomic scale order, electronic structure and dynamics of individual nanostructures.

Very pretty.  Carbon makes for neat pictures.

scienceisbeauty
scienceisbeauty:

Theoretical dodechehedron nanoscale quasi-crystals. Source.
The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has decided to award the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2011 to
Dan ShechtmanTechnion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel
“for the discovery of quasicrystals”
From the Press Release:

In quasicrystals, we find the fascinating mosaics of the Arabic world reproduced at the level of atoms: regular patterns that never repeat themselves. However, the configuration found in quasicrystals was considered impossible, and Dan Shechtman had to fight a fierce battle against established science. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2011 has fundamentally altered how chemists conceive of solid matter.

More Info:
At Nobelprize.org page
Advanced Information at nobelprize.org (pdf)
Wikipedia entry: Quasicrystal
Entry at Cornell Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics
Research: Quasicrystals at Stanford University
Introduction to Quasicrystals from  jcrystal.com

Interesting.  I am surprised that this was totally off my radar.

scienceisbeauty:

Theoretical dodechehedron nanoscale quasi-crystals. Source.

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has decided to award the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2011 to

Dan Shechtman
Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel

“for the discovery of quasicrystals”

From the Press Release:

In quasicrystals, we find the fascinating mosaics of the Arabic world reproduced at the level of atoms: regular patterns that never repeat themselves. However, the configuration found in quasicrystals was considered impossible, and Dan Shechtman had to fight a fierce battle against established science. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2011 has fundamentally altered how chemists conceive of solid matter.

More Info:

At Nobelprize.org page

Advanced Information at nobelprize.org (pdf)

Wikipedia entry: Quasicrystal

Entry at Cornell Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics

Research: Quasicrystals at Stanford University

Introduction to Quasicrystals from  jcrystal.com

Interesting.  I am surprised that this was totally off my radar.

skeptv

skepttv:

Flower Pot Fridge!

The world’s cheapest and easiest refrigerator to make, it uses minimal resources and runs completely without electricity. It’s called a zeer pot, or the pot-in-pot and was rebirthed by Mohammed Bah Abba, who put the laws of thermodynamics to work for mankind.

The zeer pot, is just two simple pots, one pot smaller than the other.
The smaller pot is put inside the bigger pot, and we fill the space between with sand. We wet the sand twice a day and cover the top with a wet towell to keep warm air from entering the interior.

Things You’ll Need:

  • Two clay (terracotta) pots, one larger than the other
  • Sand
  • Water
  • Cloth to cover the pots
  • Clay, cork or other material to plug holes in the pots

Very cool.

carbontocarnivore
All science is either physics or stamp collecting.

Ernst Rutherford

Discuss.

(via carbontocarnivore)

A quote that says at once too much and too little.  In some sense he is of course right.  Anything studied by science exists as it does because of the fundamentals of particle interaction, space, and time.  Smaller scale things are in particular bound by the rules thermodynamics and low-energy electromagnetic interaction.

If the strong force were a bit different than it is, we probably wouldn’t have fiddler crabs.  However, the particulars of quark interactions probably won’t help a biologist interested in arthropod behavior.  He or she is likely already studying his or her subjects with an efficiency that physics can’t improve much on.  

liberal-life-deactivated2011110
liberal-life:

[Intelligent Design] is not a scientific argument at all, but a religious one. It might be worth discussing in a class on the history of ideas, in a philosophy class on popular logical fallacies, or in a comparative religion class on origin myths from around the world. But it no more belongs in a biology class than alchemy belongs in a chemistry class, phlogiston in a physics class or the stork theory in a sex education class. In those cases, the demand for equal time for “both theories” would be ludicrous. Similarly, in a class on 20th-century European history, who would demand equal time for the theory that the Holocaust never happened? 
- Richard Dawkins and Jerry Coyne (Source)

liberal-life:

[Intelligent Design] is not a scientific argument at all, but a religious one. It might be worth discussing in a class on the history of ideas, in a philosophy class on popular logical fallacies, or in a comparative religion class on origin myths from around the world. But it no more belongs in a biology class than alchemy belongs in a chemistry class, phlogiston in a physics class or the stork theory in a sex education class. In those cases, the demand for equal time for “both theories” would be ludicrous. Similarly, in a class on 20th-century European history, who would demand equal time for the theory that the Holocaust never happened?

- Richard Dawkins and Jerry Coyne (Source)